Kesehatan Vegan

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A sampai Z Proses Perjuangan Hidup Ayam

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Darimanakah  asal sebuah hidangan ayam goreng di meja makan?

Jawaban : bahwa untuk menghasilkan hidangan ayam goreng, mengorbankan  sebuah kehidupan, seribu pernderitaan, seribu kebencian, seribu ketakutan, seribu dendam , seribu tangisan ayam dll…..

Chicks

Every year in the United States, 9 billion chickens raised for their flesh and 245 million chickens raised for their eggs begin their lives when they hatch along with thousands of other chicks inside giant incubators. Only a few days after birth, they are crammed into shipping crates and sent to factory farms. They will never meet their parents.

Chicks

Chicks raised for their flesh (“broiler chickens”) are dumped out of transport crates and onto the floors of massive sheds—the 9 billion chickens raised for their flesh every year in the United States won’t leave these filthy enclosures until the day they are sent to slaughter.

Broiler Sheds

With tens of thousands of chicks packed into each building, the sheds become increasingly crowded as the animals grow larger. Chickens often have to walk on top of one another—and over the bodies of others who have died—to get to food and water. Chickens function well in groups of up to about 90, which is a number low enough to allow each bird to find his or her spot in the pecking order. In crowded groups of tens of thousands, however, no such social order is possible, and in their frustration, chickens peck at one another, causing injury and death.

Ammonia

The average chicken shed holds roughly 40,000 chickens. Most sheds are rarely cleaned, so massive amounts of feces accumulate and ammonia builds up in the air. The ammonia is corrosive and burns the lungs and skin of the birds, leaving many with lung diseases or festering skin infections. A Washington Post writer who visited a chicken shed says, “Dust, feathers and ammonia choke the air in the chicken house and fans turn it into airborne sandpaper, rubbing skin raw.”

Crippled Birds

Chickens are genetically manipulated and dosed with antibiotics so that they grow bigger and faster than they ever would naturally. Chickens’ breasts weigh seven times more today than they did 25 years ago, so that by the age of 6 weeks, many broiler chickens are so top-heavy that they can no longer walk. According to Feedstuffs, a meat industry magazine, “Broilers now grow so rapidly that the heart and lungs are not developed well enough to support the remainder of the body, resulting in congestive heart failure and tremendous death losses.” Workers often throw injured hens into trashcans, leaving the birds to starve to death.

Crippled Birds

An investigator from Compassion Over Killing gives water to this crippled chick. Chickens are genetically manipulated and dosed with antibiotics so that they grow bigger and faster than they ever would naturally. Chickens’ breasts weigh seven times more today than they did 25 years ago, so that by the age of 6 weeks, many broiler chickens are so top-heavy that they can no longer walk.

Mortality

Many chickens in factory farms get sick and die because of the cramped and filthy conditions. Instead of giving their birds more space and a cleaner living area, farmers mix large quantities of antibiotics into the birds’ feed in an attempt to stave off disease, but many of the birds still die. A U.S. Department of Agriculture study found that greater than 99 percent of chicken carcasses are contaminated with E. coli bacteria, largely because of the filthy conditions in the sheds where they are raised.

Egg Industry

Male chicks are worthless to the egg industry because they don’t lay eggs and they’re too small to be used for flesh, so every year millions of them are tossed into trash bags to suffocate or are thrown—while still alive—into high-speed grinders called “macerators.”

Male Chicks

This baby is still alive, standing in a Dumpster on the corpses of other male chicks discarded by the egg industry. Male chicks are worthless to the egg industry because they don’t lay eggs and they’re too small to be used for flesh, so every year millions of them are tossed into trash bags to suffocate or are thrown—while still alive—into high-speed grinders called “macerators.”

Debeaking

In order to keep the hens from pecking one another to death out of frustration in the crowded cages, each chick has a large portion of her sensitive beak sliced off with a burning-hot blade. She is not given any pain relief, and many birds are not able to eat because of the pain and die from dehydration and a weakened immune system. Even in the least-crowded cages in the industry (five hens per cage), each hen will spend her life with four other birds in a crowded space about the size of a file drawer, unable to spread even one wing.

Battery Cages

The hens spend their entire lives in tiny wire “battery” cages, which measure roughly 18 inches by 20 inches and hold five to 11 hens who each have a wingspan of 32 inches. Each hen has an area smaller than a sheet of notebook paper in which to stand and doesn’t have enough space to spread even one wing. The cages are stacked on top of one another, so excrement from hens in higher cages often falls on those below. Ammonia and the stench of feces hang heavy in the air, and disease is rampant in these filthy, cramped conditions.

Battery Cages

Like all chickens raised for eggs, these hens have had large portions of their sensitive beaks cut off, and they will spend their entire lives in a filthy, cramped wire cage. Each hen has an area smaller than a sheet of notebook paper in which to stand and doesn’t have enough space to spread even one wing. The cages are stacked on top of one another, so excrement from hens in higher cages often falls on those below. Ammonia and the stench of feces hang heavy in the air, and disease is rampant in these filthy, cramped conditions.

Infections

In egg sheds, excrement from the chickens falls through the wire cages into enormous manure piles below. The excrement emits ammonia and other toxic fumes into the air. The combination of filth and noxious chemicals in the air leads to painful infections and abscesses. Sick animals are left to suffer without veterinary care.

Infections

Compassion Over Killing found this bird languishing in her cramped cage with a painful eye infection. Such infections are common, as are broken bones—by the time they are sent to slaughter, nearly one in three hens will be suffering from broken bones because of neglect and rough treatment.

Injuries

The ammonia in the air eats away at the hens’ feathers and causes painful skin infections. A Washington Post writer who visited a chicken shed wrote, “Dust, feathers and ammonia choke the air in the chicken house and fans turn it into airborne sandpaper, rubbing skin raw.”

Gnarled Feet

Forced to spend their entire life standing on wire grating, hens’ feet become painfully deformed. The wire cuts into their feet, and their toes become swollen and gnarled as they wrap around the unnatural surface.

Manure Pits

Hens are kept in cages suspended above enormous manure pits, and the cages are stacked so that excrement from birds in higher cages often falls on those below. Most farms rarely clean the pits, so the excrement builds up in the barns, causing skin infections and respiratory diseases.

Death in Manure Piles

Hens are kept in cages suspended above enormous manure pits, and the cages are stacked so that excrement from birds in higher cages often falls on those below. Birds who manage to escape their cages end up falling into the manure pits, where they are left to die.

Rescued From a Manure Pit

Hens are kept in cages suspended above enormous manure pits, and the cages are stacked so that excrement from birds in higher cages often falls on those below. Birds who manage to escape their cages end up falling into the manure pits, where they are left to die. An investigator from Mercy for Animals rescued this hen, who had become trapped after falling into a manure pit.

Forced Molting

When their egg production drops, hens are deprived of water and food for up to 14 days at a time in order to shock their bodies into a period of increased laying. This extremely cruel practice, called “forced molting,” causes birds to lose their feathers and a significant percentage of their body weight, and many birds die from hunger and dehydration. This hen was rescued from a factory farm after her body was devastated by forced molting.

Dead Hens

The filthy, ammonia-saturated environment of egg factory farms leads to astronomical death rates. The bodies of dead and dying birds are either left to rot in the cages with the surviving birds or thrown into piles, buckets, or even shopping carts.

Dead Hens

The filth and disease in factory egg farms eventually lead to death for many hens. The bodies of dead and dying birds are either left to rot in the cages with the surviving birds or are thrown into piles, buckets, or even shopping carts.

Transport Crates

After two years in these conditions, a hen’s body becomes exhausted, her egg production drops, and she is sent to slaughter. Chickens raised for their flesh are slaughtered after only six or seven weeks of life. Workers rush through the sheds, grabbing birds by their legs and slinging them into crates for transport; hundreds of millions suffer from broken wings and legs every year because of the rough handling during transport.

Transport Trucks

Chickens are given no food or water for the entire trip to the slaughterhouse—a journey that is often hundreds of miles long. The birds are trucked through all weather conditions, whether it is the blistering heat or the freezing cold. Many birds die during the journey.

Transport Injury

Chickens who have fallen off transport trucks can often be found dying on the side of the road. This bird was rescued by a PETA member after a fall from a truck left her with severe brain damage.

Transport Dumping

At the slaughterhouse, the terrified chickens are dumped out of the transport crates. Workers grab the birds and force their often broken legs into shackles.

Shackled for Slaughter

The terrified birds struggle to escape their shackles and often defecate and vomit on the workers. An undercover investigator at a Perdue slaughterhouse reported, “The screaming of the birds and the frenzied flapping of their wings was so loud that you had to yell to the worker next to you.”

Struggle to Escape

Terrified birds struggle to escape their shackles, and they often defecate and vomit on workers. An undercover investigator at a Perdue slaughterhouse reported, “The screaming of the birds and the frenzied flapping of their wings was so loud that you had to yell to the worker next to you.”

Throat-Cutting Blades

During a PETA investigation of a Tyson slaughterhouse, a Tyson supervisor admitted on camera that the blades often miss the birds’ necks and cut them in other parts of their bodies, causing painful injuries. This bird was cut above her right leg.

Dead Birds

This bird fell out of the leg shackles and on the ground after her throat was slit.

Stunning

After they are shackled, chickens are dragged through an electrified water bath that paralyzes them but doesn’t render them unconscious. As a result, chickens are often still conscious when their throats are cut. In her renowned book, Slaughterhouse, Gail Eisnitz explains: “Other industrialized nations require that chickens be rendered unconscious or killed prior to bleeding and scalding, so they won’t have to go through those processes conscious. Here in the United States, however, poultry plants—exempt from the Humane Slaughter Act and still clinging to the industry myth that a dead animal won’t bleed properly—keep the stunning current down to about one-tenth of that needed to render a chicken unconscious.” The bones of hens used for eggs are so brittle that they would shatter if they were dunked in the electric bath, so these birds go straight to the throat-cutting machines while they are still flapping their wings and frantically trying to escape.

Necks Cut Manually

A worker cuts the throats of birds who managed to avoid the mechanical blade. A PETA investigator in a Tyson slaughterhouse found workers ripping the heads off chickens who had missed the throat-cutting blades.

Dismemberment

When a PETA employee investigated a Tyson slaughterhouse from December 2004 to February 2005, he saw employees routinely pull the heads off birds who had avoided the neck-cutting blade and toss their heads on the ground. Watch the undercover video

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Bleeding to Death

The conveyor belt keeps moving as blood drains out of the birds. Many birds miss the throat-cutting blades altogether, and others have their throats only partially cut or are cut on a different part of their body. These birds remain conscious as they move down the line.

Blood

At the slaughterhouse, chickens are hung upside-down in shackles on conveyor belts and have their throats slit, and their bodies are drained of blood. A river of blood and feathers flows beneath the conveyor belt.

Defeathering Tanks

After their throats are cut, the chickens are dragged through tanks of scalding-hot water to remove their feathers. The slaughter line moves so fast that the birds often don’t have enough time to die, and many are still conscious when they are submerged in the scalding-hot water. Chickens (as well as turkeys and fish) are exempt from the Humane Slaughter Act, so they have no federal protection from the most egregious cruelty in slaughterhouses.

Packaged

After a miserable life and a torturous death, chickens are dismembered and packaged for consumers. Their flesh is usually contaminated with bacteria because of the filthy conditions in factory farms and slaughterhouses. One U.S. Department of Agriculture study found more than 99 percent of the chickens it tested to be tainted with E. coli bacteria, and scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health recently reported that 96 percent of the Tyson chicken flesh it tested was contaminated with dangerous, antibiotic-resistant campylobacter bacteria.

Remains

The remains of the chickens that can’t be sold to consumers are ground up and fed back to factory-farmed animals or sold to dog- and cat-food manufacturers.

Kesimpulan : bahwa untuk menghasilkan hidangan ayam goreng, mengorbankan seribu pernderitaan ayam, seribu kebencian ayam, seribu ketakutan ayam, seribu dendam ayam, seribu tangisan ayam dll…..

Referensi :

http://www.goveg.com/photos_chickens.asp

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Penulis: kesehatanvegan

Bahagia, sehat, awet muda, & panjang umur dg vegan

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